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 Make the most of local efforts...


It's not how many visitors you get...

Once you have a site that performs a function for your business, the next step is to get people to come to it. Utilizing "metatags"  and the judicious application of keywords, you can get some traffic from the search engines.  With automated site submission software you can get listed somewhere within hundreds of directories and lists. You can use web rings and join associations, advertise your site cooperatively through link exchange programs, send direct mail announcements, talk it up in newsgroups, and so on.
If you rely on these methods alone, your hit counter may be busy, but random traffic wandering in from the internet will likely contain a relatively low percentage of actual prospects.
More important than the amount of traffic you get is the quality of that traffic. It doesn't matter how many visitors your counter registers- what matters is how many of your visitors actually do business with you after or while visiting your site.

"This is the type of visitor
you want to attract."

Especially for small operations serving a niche or local market, the highest quality visitor you can get on your site is someone who is already interested in doing business with you.
With a site designed to leverage your existing advertising, to make your presentation and move your prospect toward placing an order, this is the type of visitor you want to attract.

Leverage your existing efforts...

The trouble with advertising on a slim budget is that you really can't afford the space to accomplish much more than getting your prospect's attention. The internet changes that. Now your three line classified or 1/16th page black and white can direct a prospect to your in-depth presentation on the web.
If you do any kind of advertising at all for your business, include your web address in that advertising.  Feature it prominently.   Anyone who types it into their browser has at least some interest in knowing more about what you offer.  Just make certain that your site actually provides the additional information they are looking for and is not just an online version of the same ad.

"Your web address becomes
a part of your company's name."

Whether your efforts are as simple as passing out business cards or as ambitious as a billboard/radio/television campaign, by the time a potential customer reaches your website you have already gained their interest. Cement that interest into concrete action by providing the information they need to decide whether to pursue doing business with you.
Besides business cards, phone book listings, and stationery, there are plenty of low cost ways to get your site's address out. Have magnetic signs, bumper stickers, or airbrushed front tags made for your automobiles. Have tee shirts made up, or ball caps.  Try to get your site's address into people's hands.  Give out key rings, ball point pens, calendars, promotional materials of any sort, all with your company name and URL.  Attach a signature to all your email messages that contains a clickable link to your site. In short, any time your name or your company's name is mentioned, your web address should be mentioned along with it.

It takes patience and commitment ...

Your web address becomes, for all practical purposes, a part of your company's name. Bear in mind, however, that this does require a genuine commitment to the site- nothing discourages a potential customer quite like an abandoned or obviously outdated website.
The days of "instant success" on the web, if they ever existed, are gone.  There are millions of web sites now, and these are a fraction of what is to come.  Not so different, after all, from any other endeavor- it takes effort to promote your site, and patience to see results.

 

For your promotional printing needs, visit  iPrint.com...



Promoting your site with search engines...

Make the most of local efforts...

 

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